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Books.
#1
Hello,

1) I am looking for books on non-renewable resources. A lot of people aren't convinced till you show them numbers/ figures.

2) Any book on environmental problems that can't/won't have tech fix (sequestration , Green energy, new medical procedures in case of antibiotic-resistant diseases etc)
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#2
(Fri, 22 Jun 2018 18:25:45 +0000, 06:25 PM)anything Wrote: Hello,

1) I am looking for books on non-renewable resources. A lot of people aren't convinced till you show them numbers/ figures.

2) Any book on environmental problems that can't/won't have tech fix (sequestration , Green energy, new medical procedures in case of antibiotic-resistant diseases etc)

1) Haven't read any books specifically about non-renewable resources, but in my opinion, "Ecological economics", by Daly & Farley, clearly shows how the present economic system is incapable of managing "resources", both renewable and non-renewable, "sustainably". Their solutions probably aren't very interesting from an anti-civ perspective, though.

Else, on the web site of something called "International Geosphere-Biosphere Programme", you can find a series of graphs that show accelerating trends, both socio-economic and earth system trends. The overall picture is quite bleak. Most  of them took a sharp turn upwards around 1950, they call it the "great acceleration". This is around the time tech fixes really kicked in, I guess. Maybe that can be convincing to some? You'll find one of their presentations here: http://www.igbp.net/globalchange/greatac...01630.html

2) If you meet the right/wrong person, there isn't a problem in the world that can't have a tech fix... But I think James Lovelock has some interesting points that at least I haven't seen discussed by anyone else. Have read his book "The vanishing face of Gaia" (if anyone don't know, he's the guy behind the Gaia hypothesis). In it he explains how he thinks we might pass, or already have passed, tipping points that will push "Gaia" into a totally new "state space". That is, if we see earth as a marble rolling around inside a bowl where all points on the inside of the bowl are temporarily stable states "Gaia" can "inhabit" (all more or less favorable to "life as we know it"), human influences might push the marble into a neighbouring bowl with a different set of temporarily stable states totally different from the ones in the old bowl. That means, for instance, that even if we get all the excess CO2 above pre-industrial levels out of the atmosphere, it might still be impossible for "Gaia" to get back to the state she had in pre-industrial times.

He further explains it by using an ocean ecosystem off the coast of South Africa (if I remeber correctly) as an example. When a certain specie of fish was fished to extinction (or near extinction), the ecosystem didn't simply remain the same, just without that type of fish, it "decended" to a less complex new state that supported less "life" (and i think fewer species). Here again, even if humans try to reintroduce the lost specie of fish, the ecosystem probably won't  go back to what it was. If the attempt at reintroduction succeds, the ecosystem would probably end up in a new state different from the other two (but probably not as "life sustaining" as the original one?).

Other than that I would recommend books that address how technology never will solve our problems and that it, and science in general, is part of the problem. I'm a former huge tech optimist myself. The book that sent me on the path from there towards anti-civ is "The Ascent of Humanity" by Charles Eisenstein. It's freely available here: https://ascentofhumanity.com/ (he accepts gifts from those who appreciate it).
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