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Moneyless
#1
A friend told me about Ernest Mann, «a fellow who in 1969, at the age of 42, quit a job he had held for 20 years in order to start creating his life in a way that would do away with his need for money. He saw money as the major reason why most people chose to live as voluntary slaves, and he was no longer willing to do so. He put out a newsletter about his experiments in breaking away from the money system.»

He had an economic "theory" which he called the Priceless Economic System: «If everyone stops taking pay for their work, there will be no monetary cost of production. All goods and services can then be free of charge. Thus, people will have no need for money, so they can work without pay.»

You can read a bit more about him here: http://morrisoncountyhistory.org/?page_id=524

My friend told me about Mann because I told them about another man, The Moneyless Man, who's been living without money since 2008 or so. He started it as a one year experiment, but then just carried on with it. «For the first time I experienced how connected and interdependent I was on the people and natural world around me, something I had previously only intellectualised. It is not until you become physically aware of how your own health is entirely reliant on the health of the great web of life, that ideas such as deep ecology absorb themselves into your arteries, sinews and bones.»

He found that having no money encouraged positive traits, whereas having money encouraged negative traits. «My moneyless economy was one in which helpfulness, generosity and solidarity were rewarded. Contrast that to the worlds of high finance and big business, in which a healthy dose of psychopathy will often help in making it to the top, and selfishness and ruthlessness are the qualities du jour. When we have plenty of money, we can spend our days exploiting the world around us for our own profit, and the checkout guy will still sell us our weekly groceries, the airline still fly us to the Costa del Sol. Without money, act badly enough for long enough and life would become almost impossible.»

He also found that—to his surprise—he was capable: «I realised I was capable of more than I ever imagined. I say this not out of pride, but on the basis that if I – a man who had been much more comfortable with a spreadsheet than a spade – could live from my locality, then almost anybody could. I quickly learned how to farm and to forage, and how to make things from what I found naturally around me. In essence, I discovered how to take care of myself and others in ways that didn’t inflict systemic violence on people and creatures whom I had no idea I was having such a brutal impact on through my shopping habits.»

His most important lesson was however an ecological lesson: «[ I ]n all of the time I was out there doing my little thing, species after majestic species were being made extinct faster than ever; forests, oceans and rivers were being depleted at untenable rates; and social injustice was rising exponentially, putting more and more money into the hands of those least likely to use it for the common good.» And he's absolutely right when he says that «[ w ]e need to stop the onslaught of the machine into the natural world using every means that is effective, or before we know it we will have witnessed the devastation and loss of all the beauty that still remains.»

You can read about The Moneyless Man and his experiment here: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/...-i-learned


P.S.
There's already a thread about another one year experiment that The Moneyless Man did, which turned into a more or less permanent lifestyle, no technology (FSVO technology) for a year: https://anti-civ.net/showthread.php?tid=312
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#2
(Wed, 23 May 2018 08:45:00 +0000, 08:45 AM)alexander Wrote: A friend told me about Ernest Mann, «a fellow who in 1969, at the age of 42, quit a job he had held for 20 years in order to start creating his life in a way that would do away with his need for money. He saw money as the major reason why most people chose to live as voluntary slaves, and he was no longer willing to do so. He put out a newsletter about his experiments in breaking away from the money system.»

He had an economic "theory" which he called the Priceless Economic System: «If everyone stops taking pay for their work, there will be no monetary cost of production. All goods and services can then be free of charge. Thus, people will have no need for money, so they can work without pay.»

You can read a bit more about him here: http://morrisoncountyhistory.org/?page_id=524

My friend told me about Mann because I told them about another man, The Moneyless Man, who's been living without money since 2008 or so. He started it as a one year experiment, but then just carried on with it. «For the first time I experienced how connected and interdependent I was on the people and natural world around me, something I had previously only intellectualised. It is not until you become physically aware of how your own health is entirely reliant on the health of the great web of life, that ideas such as deep ecology absorb themselves into your arteries, sinews and bones.»

He found that having no money encouraged positive traits, whereas having money encouraged negative traits. «My moneyless economy was one in which helpfulness, generosity and solidarity were rewarded. Contrast that to the worlds of high finance and big business, in which a healthy dose of psychopathy will often help in making it to the top, and selfishness and ruthlessness are the qualities du jour. When we have plenty of money, we can spend our days exploiting the world around us for our own profit, and the checkout guy will still sell us our weekly groceries, the airline still fly us to the Costa del Sol. Without money, act badly enough for long enough and life would become almost impossible.»

He also found that—to his surprise—he was capable: «I realised I was capable of more than I ever imagined. I say this not out of pride, but on the basis that if I – a man who had been much more comfortable with a spreadsheet than a spade – could live from my locality, then almost anybody could. I quickly learned how to farm and to forage, and how to make things from what I found naturally around me. In essence, I discovered how to take care of myself and others in ways that didn’t inflict systemic violence on people and creatures whom I had no idea I was having such a brutal impact on through my shopping habits.»

His most important lesson was however an ecological lesson: «[ I ]n all of the time I was out there doing my little thing, species after majestic species were being made extinct faster than ever; forests, oceans and rivers were being depleted at untenable rates; and social injustice was rising exponentially, putting more and more money into the hands of those least likely to use it for the common good.» And he's absolutely right when he says that «[ w ]e need to stop the onslaught of the machine into the natural world using every means that is effective, or before we know it we will have witnessed the devastation and loss of all the beauty that still remains.»

You can read about The Moneyless Man and his experiment here: https://www.theguardian.com/environment/...-i-learned


P.S.
There's already a thread about another one year experiment that The Moneyless Man did, which turned into a more or less permanent lifestyle, no technology (FSVO technology) for a year: https://anti-civ.net/showthread.php?tid=312

Thanks for that Alex! As for Mark Boyle I remember someone pointing to the fact that he is/was a well off fellow. I don't mind living without much, but not owning land and having friends with little to spare as well makes the initial investment difficult. And you should think that his writing for amongst the guardian should help,no?
I don't much like using privilege as an argument, but in cases like this I certainly thinks it helps out having a fair amount of social or physical capital.
There is a german lady as well who has lived a long time without money. Can't remember her name, sorry!
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