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Hey
#1
Bug 
Hi there. Trying to write stuff with an anti-civ bent, fiction and non. Interested in the Primitive North, anti-professionalism, psychedelic nature, eco-gothic landscapes. Anthropology, lit, Gothic Studies and educational background. Look forward to talking to like-minded people as feel a bit isolated and need to test out some of my own ideas and get a sense of the wider movement. Take it easy,

fossilised-shark-tooth-in-a-plastic-box
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#2
Hallo & welcome!

What is the "Primitive North"? I've vaguely heard of ecogothic, but I'm by no means knowledgeable about it.

Good to have someone with a different perspective coming in here!
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#3
Thanks Alexander. Looking forward to learning more on here! 'Primitive North' is a term I basically made up - being a northerner myself I'm interested in the idea of a pre and post-civillisation North. Don't know much about the former but believe there were two distinct populations of hgs and agriculturalists who eventually merged...for the post- civ North I'm interested in fiction similar to Russel Hoban's Riddley Walker. As for eco gothic, the only official collection out so far I think is the one by Hughes and Smith. It's pretty anthropocentric I guess, about the conflict between the horrors of Eco catastrophe and nature itself as a site of horror. I guess I'm interested in haunted space and what witches/ ghosts would remain in a post-civ world. Whilst civilisation may have put the witches in, as Tucker describes in 'For Wildness and Anarchy' can they ever be taken out again and would we even want them to be? Whilst I advocate a direct life experience within nature I also like the idea of nature as a mysterious, spiritual and even haunted space. Any ideas welcome :)
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#4
That's an interesting way of thinking about it. What I'm experimenting with at the moment, on a personal level, is psychedelic 'episodes' in nature (drug free...) Meditating on scenes, trees, creatures, sounds, smells and then switching perception - the sort of child-like awe JZ talks about. I'm essentially seeking a sacred interaction without the Gods and worship of Paganism I guess.
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#5
The critique of civilisation (class society) must be a wholescale critique (i.e. not a critique of it's composite parts -- medecine, technology, etc) or it is no critique at all but merely reformist criticism.
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#6
Hey KyXen. Not sure how that is relevant here, apologies if I'm missing something. Surely the concept of civilisation is much broader than 'class society'? What about communist civilisation? Also, whilst I agree with the sentiment, without criticising composite parts, aren't people going to lose interest by hearing the same thing over again? When I started questioning civilisation I would think 'yeah, but what about the need for healthcare' and then I researched articles that dealt with this. The said articles weren't reformist, just focused.
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#7
(Tue, 15 May 2018 07:36:40 +0000, 07:36 AM)fossil Wrote: Hey KyXen. Not sure how that is relevant here, apologies if I'm missing something. Surely the concept of civilisation is much broader than 'class society'? What about communist civilisation?  Also, whilst I agree with the sentiment, without criticising composite parts, aren't people going to lose interest by hearing the same thing over again? When I started questioning civilisation I would think 'yeah, but what about the need for healthcare' and then I researched articles that dealt with this. The said articles weren't reformist, just focused.

Hello fossil and welcome.
Im sorry to go off topic, but im very curious how did an article dealt with healthcare in relation to civilization ? Could you point out the article ?
I defenently agree with you civilization is more then just class society even though that is one part of it.

I hope you fell at home around here, :).
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#8
Hi there and thanks.
A recent example I read was 'Sticks, Stones and Nursing Homes' in Kevin Tucker's 'For Wildness and Anarchy.' In relation to KyXen's point, it focuses on old age and the care home system but ends with a broader, wholescale attack on civilisation. I agree with KyXen that the underlying current of any critique should be a critique of civilisation, but am still puzzled as to how his comment related to anything I'd said previously: I mentioned anti-professionalism, but then you could very easily write an article or personal essay focusing on that (I'm sure people already have) before concluding with a broader critique. Best wishes, F :)
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