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Documenting Ecological Collapse
#1
Read Desert, innit?
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#2
(Fri, 11 May 2018 12:31:06 +0000, 12:31 PM)Zhachev Wrote:
(Fri, 11 May 2018 06:05:27 +0000, 06:05 AM)Ola Boms Wrote: Read Desert, innit?

That's right, Ola, Desert does an OK job at this.

Anonymous - Desert - https://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/...desert.pdf
I'd be interested to hear how folks here relate to this stuff. Personally I'm a beans and potato sort of fellow. But there are some obvious limitations to that of course, takes a village to raise a child or some shit. And things are getting weirder every day, the last couple of years have been odd to say the least.
Are there some constructive stuff to do these days you reckon? Or is it just some bleak shit and better get a gun and a ton of cocaine sort of trajectory (The Road)?
Self preservation runs deep (even in its inverted forms), so a cocktail of social darwinism and mutual aid is going to be an intriguing moral ground to tread.
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#3
The Fall of Rome
W. H. Auden, 1907 - 1973

(for Cyril Connolly)

The piers are pummelled by the waves;
In a lonely field the rain
Lashes an abandoned train;
Outlaws fill the mountain caves.

Fantastic grow the evening gowns;
Agents of the Fisc pursue
Absconding tax-defaulters through
The sewers of provincial towns.

Private rites of magic send
The temple prostitutes to sleep;
All the literati keep
An imaginary friend.

Cerebrotonic Cato may
Extol the Ancient Disciplines,
But the muscle-bound Marines
Mutiny for food and pay.

Caesar’s double-bed is warm
As an unimportant clerk
Writes I DO NOT LIKE MY WORK
On a pink official form.

Unendowed with wealth or pity,
Little birds with scarlet legs,
Sitting on their speckled eggs,
Eye each flu-infected city.

Altogether elsewhere, vast
Herds of reindeer move across
Miles and miles of golden moss,
Silently and very fast.
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#4
(Fri, 11 May 2018 15:50:12 +0000, 03:50 PM)Ola Boms Wrote: I'd be interested to hear how folks here relate to this stuff. Personally I'm a beans and potato sort of fellow. But there are some obvious limitations to that of course, takes a village to raise a child or some shit. And things are getting weirder every day, the last couple of years have been odd to say the least.
Are there some constructive stuff to do these days you reckon? Or is it just some bleak shit and better get a gun and a ton of cocaine sort of trajectory (The Road)?
Self preservation runs deep (even in its inverted forms), so a cocktail of social darwinism and mutual aid is going to be an intriguing moral ground to tread.

We've already talked about this AFK, but I thought I'd pick up this thread.

It seems to me that death is going to be very important in the near-ish future. Heidegger wrote a lot about how it is in death we truly meet and care for each other (and ourselves), and my observations in life have confirmed this, at least for my own part. There is no change, there is no spontaneity, there is no love—unless there is death. Death is what grips us out of our das Man[0], and thrusts us into angst, wherein we truly grasp our Mitsein[1]. In this angst we aren't das Man. Das Man becomes trivial, inauthentic, and pointless—at least in some aspects. Floods, earthquakes, tsunamis, forest fires—all of these variations of Mother Earth spanking her disobedient children—have an incredible potential for upheaval. And not just for individuals—even God won't be able to ignore the devastation.

We've seen this time and time again. It is in death we meet each other. Mutual aid soars as buildings collapse. In fact, the system is in many ways designed such that mutual aid is successfully suppressed when buildings don't collapse.

I do not mean this in some millenarianist sense. I'm not waiting for the collapse to reach some point in which Something Big will happen, and then everything will be fine. I want to better myself every day, irrespective of the collapsing. Devastation per se won't bring about celebration. But I find it hard to see the latter without the former. I.e., devastation seems necessary but not sufficient for celebration.


[0]  There is no great translation of this to English, but you can think of it as the "one"—as in "what one does". One gets an education, one shops, one votes, it's just what one does. See e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heideggeri...he_They%27.
[1]  Being in the world is being with others. We are together, or we aren't at all. See e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heideggeri...Being-with.
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