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Summer of Love
#1
I usually don't like documentaries about the 1960s, but this one is actually pretty good. It gives background and context to the period that is often missing from similar documentaries. There is also a radical dimension to it that has often gone overlooked in all the sneering and mocking over those damn 'hippies'.

Summer of Love:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bIXIaYIDOvw
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#2
Enjoyed this a lot. Whilst there are clearly many flaws to the movement, getting a whole generation of kids to 'drop out' is pretty awesome and there's hope in that. It's just a shame that modern youth movements (I'm thinking hipsters, but they're not alone) tend to buy urban culture, tech, marketing and consumerism hook line and sinker. The UK underground (essentially Grime I guess) is full of tracks about mobile phones and so much pop/ music culture is centred around the concept of the 'nightclub' as opposed to being outdoors.
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#3
<< It was the largest migration of young people in the history of America...>>

WRONG

<<...a revolutionary movement...>>

WRONG

in England, we had our Summer of Love twenty years later. It was equally illusory and I am ashamed to say I was under its illusory SUN.
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#4
Ultimately, I guess you're right - all this is illusory, including art, literature, etc. I find it hard to let go of pop culture because I am, like everyone, completely indoctrinated. As I writer, I find it incredibly hard to accept that the books I love (and hope to write) are part of the problem. I'm trying to find a personal connection with nature outside of it all, but even that is influenced by what I've read and learnt and know. So what, ultimately is the answer, without just saying everything is rubbish all the time? 

As people have said on other threads, I don't think any of this is going anywhere. Even if civilisation came crashing down tomorrow, people would still play Nirvana songs and read Wordsworth. Perhaps such artefacts would become ghosts? Stories to tell around campfires, as in the naff 'Reign of Fire' movie where Star Wars has become a children's fable. Even then, is it really truly irrelevant or illusory? I think that symbolic culture will prove impossible to erase completely without some level of oppressive mind control and perhaps therein lies the key distinction between pre and post civilisation? Admittedly, I'm relatively new to this line of thought, which probably shows :/ Might humans emerge from civilisation like a hermit crab who has found a Coke can to use as a shell, culturally speaking?
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#5
(Tue, 15 May 2018 06:39:27 +0000, 06:39 AM)KyXen Wrote: << It was the largest migration of young people in the history of America...>>

WRONG

<<...a revolutionary movement...>>


Was there a larger one? If so, when?
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#6
(Tue, 15 May 2018 20:21:46 +0000, 08:21 PM)Zhachev Wrote:
(Tue, 15 May 2018 10:13:41 +0000, 10:13 AM)fossil Wrote: Might humans emerge from civilisation like a hermit crab who has found a Coke can to use as a shell, culturally speaking?

That reemergence would mean ideological contamination, as all culture today is representative of the dominant culture.

Yes, that’s my point. I’m not saying it’s a good thing, merely inevitable in the immediate sense. I’m suggesting it will be hard to shake off, so how do we deal with that?
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#7
Interesting and mostly fair documentary. Thanks, Odin! It does a good job at contextualising the hippies with such a short runtime. I wish they'd mention the sexist issues of the time (e.g. with the Diggers) as well, but oh well.
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