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Anti-civ journal
#31
One problem, which I've been meaning to write about—perhaps via Heidegger—is that we are so alienated in our daily life now, that "real time and space" is not necessarily much better. What's worse, trying to connect with someone who's interested in the same things as you, and who's thinking critically about this madness we're in, &c., through a computer screen—or trying to connect with a bunch of zombies that don't care about much beyond satisfying their surrogate activities?

Of course, if you live in a city with enough people, you're likely able to forge something meaningful with someone, provided you find them (which perhaps might happen online). (Related: I'm hopefully meeting someone from site rather soon-ish!)
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#32
Matt Wrote:Likewise, but I have serious doubts that the internet is the place to find it

Can we really find human relations on an inhuman medium?

The aptly titled World Wide Web is the most atomised entity is an already atomised world. Even in prison we can effect real human relations by shouting and screaming, banging on the door, exchanging herbs through the pipe networks, or if we are fortunate conversing or fighting with our cellmate.

On the internet human relations are reduced to tapping away on electronic devices to produce a digital code that through the good auspices of a benevolent capital are relayed to another that receives our message by staring at a glaring screen that leaves its beastly impression on our eyes even when the operation is complete.
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#33
(Thu, 22 Feb 2018 07:08:37 +0000, 07:08 AM)alexander Wrote: One problem, which I've been meaning to write about—perhaps via Heidegger—is that we are so alienated in our daily life now, that "real time and space" is not necessarily much better.

At least for my purposes, your use of the word "much" is decisive here. The arguably marginal extent to which real-world interactions are "better" than digital ones is enough for me to prefer the former to the latter.

alexander Wrote:What's worse, trying to connect with someone who's interested in the same things as you, and who's thinking critically about this madness we're in, &c., through a computer screen—or trying to connect with a bunch of zombies that don't care about much beyond satisfying their surrogate activities?


As much as I appreciate the Kaczynski reference, the fact is that I tend to enjoy the company of people who don't think exactly the same way as myself to ones that do. For quite some time, I've felt that ideological agreement is no basis on which to build a friendship. To be perfectly honest, I'd prefer the company of most hipsters and apolitical types to the company of most anarchists and other assorted radicals any day of the week. Couple that with the fact I just enjoy being outdoors and the choice for me is obvious.
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#34
I'll happily concede that it is likely marginally better. However, just because I marginally prefer sweet potatoes to pumpkins, that doesn't mean I won't enjoy pumpkin every now and again as well.

As for the company you keep—I did not mean that you would necessarily need to have an ideological alignment, or anything of the sort. But I find it difficult to socialise with zombies. And as someone who grew up in a very tiny place, I'm quite happy to have had the Internet available back then.
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#35
Matt Wrote:To be perfectly honest, I'd prefer the company of most hipsters and apolitical types to the company of most anarchists and other assorted radicals any day of the week.

This has been my experience, especially over the last ten years of economic crisis and popular uprisings. It is the man/woman on the street, for want of a better expression, that has most often surprised me with a revolutionary perspective, and the radicals that seem stuck in the muck. The last have become first and the first have become last. I guess that's what happens in revolutionary times. After 1917 in Russia, it was the radical party of Bolsheviks that became the stalwarts of capitalism and the status quo.

Anyway, back to the matter at hand, has anyone got any ideas of a subject of an article they would like to read in this proposed journal? My first thoughts would be a study of the opposing forms of agriculture, subsistence and industrial. After all, this holds the key to the origin of so-called civilisation. It was by the production of large surpluses of agricultural product through the use of industrial means such as the dam that civilisation first arose and then subjugated the vast tracts of land given over to subsistence farming.
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#36
Woody Allen Wrote:To die before the harvest, the crops, the grains, fields of rippling wheat, wheat, all there is in life is wheat.

You make very good points, Zachev. Of course it is normal now to meet people first online. I too feel that I have got to know some great people with wide interests on this medium, I just haven't met them in the flesh yet. Shyness and wariness but most of all logistics/money have prevented these meetings but I look forward to meeting some.

You are also right that the subject I broached is more of a book than a journal. If I was to pinpoint one subject it would be a comparative study of archetypal cultivars of classical civilisation and human civilisation: wheat versus amaranthus. As you can tell, I simply cannot ignore the fact that civilisation has two opposing definitions. This reason, and the fact that when it comes to academic work I am exceptionally lazy, will probably preclude my involvement in any future journal.
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#37
Donation sounds the best, most egalitarian option. As far as the matter of electronic versus paper, I have seen two many mountains of unsold journals gathering dust to think that a printed journal is wise.
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#38
I had another idea for an article. A study of the history of Gaza/Aza city. The history and destiny of Gaza is a key to unlocking class-ical civilisation. Up to this point the city has been dominated by Canaan, Philistines, Judah, Greece, Rome, Islam, Crusader armies, Marmalades, Turkey, Britain, Egypt, Israel and now Palestine. The fate of the native working population and specifically whether that working class can raise itself to the "ruling power" (inverted commas placed round that term because if the working population is the ruling power there is no longer any population to rule over as class division will have ceased to exist along with so-called civilisation itself) is the fate of Earth itself.
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#39
Hello all,
I just saw this thread and thought I should mention that I have just co-created a journal with two other editors that is specifically anti-civilization. I will post about it in another thread shortly.
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