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A pretty interesting article about the political landscape of the Rojavan revolution.  And just out of curiosity tell me how you feel about Rojava cause I see peoples opinions vary wildly, might be a good discussion.  I hold strong solidarity with their movement myself and wish nothing but the best for there movement.

http://hevale.nihilist.li/2017/09/interv...-in-rojava
I've never seen at as a state building excersice I agree with you that it wouldn't solve any problems, which is why i'm not crazy over whats been happening in Catalonia recently. It all depends on your definition of the state. I would describe it as an overreaching governmental body that exacts their authority to rule over and individual regardless of location in that state. Rojava focus is on local governance you control where you live basically, which is the beginning of any real freedom at least to me. It's based on Bookchin's idea of Democratic Confederalism now say what ever you want about Bookchin he gets a lot of hate unjustly in my view but he was on the right track on how to organize people in the fairest way possible at least in the context of a organized society as a whole I'm more of a believer of Stirner's Union Of Egoist concept these day's but I see elements of that in Rojava's organization.
Don't even get me started on Bookchin. Suffice it to say that I think his bad wrap is well deserved.
(Wed, 04 Oct 2017 00:31:09 +0000, 12:31 AM)Matt Wrote: [ -> ]Don't even get me started on Bookchin. Suffice it to say that I think his bad wrap is well deserved.

Why if you don't mind me asking?  I'm not all the way in the Bookchin camp myself but he was my platform into anarchist thought and I still stand for some of the things he preached.
(Wed, 04 Oct 2017 03:33:44 +0000, 03:33 AM)Lateralus Wrote: [ -> ]Why if you don't mind me asking? 


Because I see Bookchin as a stodgy and rigid ideologue who wasn't receptive to any other interpretations of anarchism aside from his own. For more on this, check out his essay,

"Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm"
http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/m...able-chasm

followed by the first chapter of Bob Black's book, Anarchy After Leftism, entitled,

"Murray Bookchin, Grumpy Old Man"
https://sniggle.net/anarchy/grumpy.html

I don't mean to be undiplomatic, but that's my honest take on Bookchin. Do with it what you will.
(Thu, 05 Oct 2017 17:30:46 +0000, 05:30 PM)Matt Wrote: [ -> ]
(Wed, 04 Oct 2017 03:33:44 +0000, 03:33 AM)Lateralus Wrote: [ -> ]Why if you don't mind me asking? 


Because I see Bookchin as a stodgy and rigid ideologue who wasn't receptive to any other interpretations of anarchism aside from his own. For more on this, check out his essay,

"Social Anarchism or Lifestyle Anarchism: An Unbridgeable Chasm"
http://theanarchistlibrary.org/library/m...able-chasm

followed by the first chapter of Bob Black's book, Anarchy After Leftism, entitled,

"Murray Bookchin, Grumpy Old Man"
https://sniggle.net/anarchy/grumpy.html

I don't mean to be undiplomatic, but that's my honest take on Bookchin. Do with it what you will.

I can see where your coming from I've always sort of had issues with Bookchin's complete backlash against individualism and his insistence on participating in local government.  I've ironically used Bookchin's theory of social ecology as a platform in my new found anti civ thought.  I would of considered myself a full blown Communalist a year prior but I've had a change of heart mainly after I read Stirner.  I've always just picked up bits of ideology from everyone I've read and mashed it together.
To return to the original topic, I hadn't even heard of "Rojava" prior to reading your post. I don't follow the situation in Syria very closely, so I don't really have a lot to say about it. My initial gut reaction is to say that it's atleast slightly reassuring to see people fighting ISIS who are doing so neither on behalf of the Assad regime nor any Western military power (although the extent to which they can resist being co-opted by the West will remain to be seen). I wouldn't go so far as to say that I "support" what the Rojava fighters are fighting for (to whatever extent I even know what that is). However, considering the sheer level of violence being carried out by everyone else involved, it's at least nice to see people who appear to be engaging in violence for some of the right reasons. Even if I don't agree with the ideological underpinnings of what they're fighting for, hopefully they can inject a bit of an anti-authoritarian sensibility in a part of the world where anything even resembling anarchist activity is next to impossible. Expecting people in Syria to have an explicitly anti-civ analysis is probably a tad unrealistic, so that's my best attempt at giving credit where credit is due.
Zhachev Wrote:
Matt Wrote:Expecting people in Syria to have an explicitly anti-civ analysis is probably a tad unrealistic...

Why?

Because, in a part of the world as steeped in ultra-conservative religious fundamentalism as Syria, even something as watered-down as Bookchin's "democratic confederalism" would, I highly suspect, be seen by many as wildly subversive and heretical. Maybe it's just cynicism on my part, but there really isn't a whole lot going on in the Middle East that I would consider to be "positive" developments from a radical anti-authoritarian perspective. It's mostly just a complete clusterfuck and I don't see that changing anytime soon. That being the case, even if I don't "agree" with the ideological underpinnings of these Rojava fighters, it's at least a marginal improvement on Assad carrying out wholesale genocide in Aleppo. If there's hidden potential for explicitly anti-civ resistance in Syria that I'm just not seeing, then fantastic; but, until I start seeing it, I'd rather see these Rojava fighters continue doing what they're doing than not do it at all.
I don't disagree with anything you just said. The position that I'm taking here is not one that I'd like to see others adopt or even one that I'd be particularly convinced by if I was in your shoes. This is no "theoretical critique" that I'm presenting here, it's just an articulation of my own cynicism with regard to the possibility of explicitly anti-civ resistance in the Middle East. In my opinion, it's probably never going to happen. Ever. In the absence thereof, I'm almost forcing myself to see something positive in what Rojava is doing; and keep in mind that this is coming from someone who never even heard of them until a few days ago.
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